Recycled Book Clutches

PairA

I’d been eyeing this zipped clutch tutorial from See Kate Sew for months. Then when I made brunch plans with a few friends for last Saturday (which happened to be February 13th), my inner Leslie Knope kicked in, and I decided to DIY some Galentine’s Day gifts.

giphy (1)

Source: Giphy


I stopped by Salvation Army to pick up some old hardback books. Playing off the Valentine’s Day theme, my initial hope was that there would be some comically cheesy oldtimey erotica, with like, a shirtless Fabio type on the cover. That would be funny, no? Sadly, there was no such thing.

Amongst the books I did find, however, was a cloying novel entitled How to Meet Cute Boys. Usually the idea of destroying books hurts me a little bit, but I rather enjoyed ripping this one apart. If I hadn’t already recycled the pages, I would read a bit to you now. You would laugh and cringe and then cry, probably.

1A

Then I had a crisis of self-doubt—I thought it was hi-larious, but would a recipient find the book title insulting? I saw it as subversion—a repurposing of chick lit for more practical and stylish ends… but that didn’t necessarily mean said friend would feel that way.

So I chickened out… and decided to keep this one for myself. Everyone wins!

1B

I basically followed the See Kate Sew instructions to the letter. I did use hot glue instead of the specified glue, because it was what I had on hand, and it seemed to work ok.

I am also now OBSESSED with Heat ‘n Bond. It has made me realize that there are a lot of things around me that probably need to have fabric stuck to them.

1C

Anyway, the nice thing about this project is that it can make a strong visual impact without requiring much fabric—it’s a good stash buster. The fabric for Cute Boys is a bright, mod floral—I found it in a bargain bin in a vintage clothing store in Lugano, Switzerland.

3D

3A

3B

3C

3E

3G

For Novel Destinations, I used these complementary bold botanical prints—canvas-type fabrics—that I found at my Salvation Army here in Chicago a while back.

3H

2C

For Left Bank, I chose not to add fabric to the front and back covers; the Parisian street scenes are charming as they are. For the lining and zippered portions, I used complementary floral oilcloths that I coincidentally also picked up in Switzerland, though these were purchased in a little boutique in Bern.

2B

(Side note: the oilcloth holds its shape really well, doesn’t fray, and doesn’t require the Heat ‘n Bond—but the shiny/slick side also does not stick to hot glue very well. I ended up using bias tape to bind the edges, then gluing the bias tape).

2G

2F

I also lined each book with a single piece of fabric across both inside covers and the inside spine—it looked a little neater than in the tutorial. And I added an extra piece of fabric to create a couple of pockets: one to fit standard IDs/credit cards, and one for cash.

2D

2E

To complete the gifts, I added these Galentine’s-Day-appropriate pocket mirrors from Paper Source. And I couldn’t resist—and totally splurged on—these adorable mini notebooks from Ted Baker. I am such a sucker for anything that comes with a teeny, tiny pen attached—possibly because it reminds me of a dance card (I say that like I totally remember dance cards from real life and not just movies).

Source: First Impressions


Happy belated Galentine’s Day!

PairC

Vintage Finds at the Kane County Flea Market

FleaMarketTitle

Along with a couple of friends, I made it out to the Kane County Flea Market for the very first time this past Sunday. Despite the heavy heat and humidity, we had a fantastic time browsing and mocking and admiring and coveting our way through the interminable stalls. From mounted insects to bedazzled baseball caps to handpainted signs to souvenir china, anything you could possibly want to buy—and much more besides—was up for sale.

I was the big spender of the day, and came home with quite a haul:

FleaMarketFinds

My big splurge was this 1960s knitting basket covered in crocheted flowers. I may use it to store sewing supplies, but I’m also tempted to carry it as a gloriously tacky purse. Picture using it to tote a small blanket to a park for a picnic. It’s rather lovely, no?

60s-Knitting-Basket

I also picked up a smattering of vintage sewing notions. The bias tape and elastic may seem random, but I think they’ll come in handy for a few projects coming up in my queue. I already have at least one sewing gauge (possibly more?)—but I never seem to be able to find it. The white and blue table runner was cheap and in good condition, perfect for another project like this one. And I couldn’t resist the violet firework print cotton (two yards).

SewingNotions

Then there’s this teeny tiny matchbook sewing kit.

MiniSewingKit

Adorbs.

MiniSewingKitInside

I also picked up this cocktail book in a box—mostly because I like the deco feel of the design.

HollywoodCocktails

CocktailVendomeSpread

I also enjoy that the hangover cures at the very end are printed upside down:

Cocktail_MorningAfter

I have this thing about notepads that have a built-in pen or pencil—it’s a lingering—and yes, weird—obsession from my childhood. So I was immediately drawn to this travel notebook.

TripJournal

It contains such essential points of reference as railroad distances between US cities.

RailroadDistances

And how to use a watch as a compass.

GeneralInformation

People used to have to write their itineraries down. On paper. Crazy.

PlacesVisited

And finally, when I saw this locket pin for $3, I had to have it in honor of everyone’s favorite Bright, Victorian Beauty, Samantha Parkington. Yep, I’m basically 9 years old.

Locket

All totaled, I spent about $35. Not too shabby!

FleaMarketOutside