Custom Fabric

Remember my July sketches? I modified the art slightly and had custom fabric printed!

CustomFabricA

It was a total experiment—I had no idea what to expect. I uploaded my art to Green Park Studios, paid $40, and less than one week later, I was holding two yards of midweight cotton printed with my very own design . It couldn’t have been simpler.

CustomFabricB

My initial plan was to use this fabric as a lining. But now that I see how well it turned out (if I do say so myself), I want it to be more visible. A skirt maybe?

CustomFabricC

I think if I printed this on a lighter, gauzier fabric, it would make a great summer scarf. Or picture rows and rows of coats for winter. This whole print-your-own thing could be a very addictive discovery…

 

A Month of Outfits, or Time to Clean Out My Closet

I’ve always—in theory—loved the idea of keeping a regular journal or sketchbook. How satisfying it must be to synthesize one’s day into some kind of record or output. I also admire style bloggers who post daily photos of their outfits. In an experiment that severely tested my capacity for follow-through, I tried to combine both ideas by making a quick sketch of each day’s outfit for the month of July.

Click on the image below to view at full size:

JulyOutfits

Yikes. As a visual compilation, it’s interesting—but it also feels excessive and self-indulgent in a way I hadn’t necessarily anticipated. Like a sick, backwards The Hundred Dresses, it represents the exact opposite of the growing movement to live with less, to pare one’s wardrobe down to the basics.

The good news is that, despite having such an obscenely large repository of clothing to choose from, I apparently rotate through the selection quite aggressively. Things get worn, and they DO, in fact, bring me joy. Still, I see a serious closet purge in my future.

The data:
Number of days I wore something vintage or secondhand: 17 (At least I’m recycling!)
Number of days I wore something I made: 3
Key takeaway: Bright vintage dresses are pretty much my go-to on hot summer days—and I really don’t shy away from colors or patterns.

Originally I had thought that when the month was up, there was a chance that I would want to continue to do this daily. This could be My Thing. HELLZ NO. It was WAY too much work. Especially since I will be spending much of my foreseeable free time cleaning out that closet.

Sketches of Costumes and Sets for The Royal Ballet

AThe Invitation
1960, Costume design by Nicholas Georgiadis

 I grew up in a homogenous suburban bubble on the edge of a mid-sized, historically industrial city, and then I went to school in a homogenous collegiate bubble on the edge of a mid-sized, historically industrial city. So when I spent the spring semester of my junior year studying in London, my field of view widened drastically—particularly artistically.

In addition to visiting countless museums and seeing plays of all scales and scopes, I saw the Royal Ballet twice: Frederick Ashton’s La Fille Mal Gardée, and Kenneth MacMillan’s Romeo and Juliet.

I loved both.

Cover

Last weekend, I went to a magical Barnes and Noble that has a cheap used book section (yes, really!), and I found this 1981 compendium: The Royal Ballet: The First Fifty Years by Alexander Bland. I had to have it. Yes, it has a lot of dense copy about company/production history which I will never read, and comprehensive indices with lists of dancers and repertory, as well as moderately interesting production photos. But the best part? It includes beautiful full-color sketches and illustrations of costumes and set design.

Fascinating and inspiring, no? Such diverse ideas and illustration styles.

GTop Left: Giselle (Bathilde) 1968, costume design by Peter Farmer.
Top Right: The Sleeping Beauty (a courtier) 1973, costume design by Peter Farmer.
Bottom Row: Mayerling 1978, Costume designs by Nicholas Georgiadis.

BLes Patineurs
Set and costumes designed by William Chappell, 1937

ERomeo and Juliet
1965 decor by Nicholas Georgiagis

FAnastasia
1971, Designed by Barry Kay

CThe Rake’s Progress
Costume sketches by Rex Whistler for the 1942 revival, annotated by Whistler and Valois

IElite Syncopations
1974, Costume designs by Ian Spurling