Two-piece Dress

Two-piece-Dress(Thanks to my lovely sister—above—who is a much better and more enthusiastic model than I am.)

I knew at the beginning of the summer that I wanted to make a two-piece dress. Preferably of the non-midrift-bearing variety.

Inspirationa) Legend & Song Dutch Wax Separates at Anthropologie
b) Thakoon RTW Spring 2015
c) Disco Floral Matching Separates at Pixie Market

I had a pretty good idea of the silhouette I wanted to create: a looser top, and a gathered skirt with a high waistband. I went through my vintage patterns and found this juniors dress from the 60s (Simplicity 3541). The vest-thing (shown over a dress on the pattern envelope) worked perfectly as my top.

pattern

And… I just winged (past-tense of wing?) the skirt. It’s very basic: two rectangles of fabric (one for the waistband and one for the skirt itself) and a zipper in the back. This is a good tutorial for making this type of skirt without a pre-existing pattern.

2-piece-dress-side-by-side

The material itself is a cotton print that I picked up at a thrift store. The back of the top wraps around to the front and snaps in place. The snaps are hidden by two vintage buttons that I purchased at an antique store.

two-piece-dress_detail

The best part? Because this dress is technically separates, it’s easy to mix and match them with other pieces:

separates_filter

Utensil Roll

In continuing the picnic theme, I also made a sleeve/roll for transporting utensils. This is again very easy, and could be modified to fit anything from silverware to art supplies.

For this particular version I used a cotton print. I’ve also made a sturdier version out of faux leather (pinking the edges instead of fraying them) that I used as fancy gift wrap for a set of bar utensils.

Utensil Roll Steps 1–9

See fraying tips here. Because this was part of a wedding gift—a picnic set for two—I only created two utensil sleeves, and put two forks in one sleeve and two knives in the other. This is totally flexible though, and can change to suit your needs.

All wrapped up, with places to go:

Napkin_Roll

Picnic roll and matching set of frayed-edge napkins:

napkins_napkin_roll

Picnic Napkins

Picnic Napkins

These napkins are incredibly easy. I started by selecting a few coordinating prints in bright colors from the fat quarters section of the fabric store. I used the same fabric for both sides of each napkin, but you could use two different fabrics for each, and voila—reversible!

To make each napkin, cut two squares. Mine were approximately 9″ x 9″, but you could make larger dinner napkins or smaller cocktail napkins. Be careful to cut along the grain and to keep the corners as square as possible. This REALLY helps down the road when you fray the edges. Some of mine—those that (ahem) maybe weren’t so square—turned out worse than others. You learn as you go, you know?

Pin the two squares together back-to-back, with right sides facing out. Sew around all four sides, leaving a 1/2″ seam allowance. I used a zig-zag stitch, because why not. You can use thread that matches your fabric, or, assuming you are confident in your ability to sew a straight line, choose a bright, contrasting color for some drama. Gettin’ crazy here.

Then comes the never-ending fraying. Use a pin to remove individual threads along the edge of the fabric. The best way for me to describe it is to not describe it at all, but to instead show you a very close up picture:

Fraying Edges

Yeah. Thread by thread. You will do this to both squares of fabric, along all four sides. It will take a long time. I suggest you pop in a movie or two, depending on how many napkins you’re making. I find that BBC’s 6-episode Pride and Prejudice is a wonderful go-to for just such an occasion.

Anyway, this is the thread pile that was accumulating on my couch. And my coworkers wonder why I have bits of thread stuck to my clothes all the time…

Loose_Threads

And then you are done!

Picnic_Napkins